How to Make Your Own Ghee

How to make your own ghee is indeed a common question for ghee lovers. Ghee is one of those ingredients that can be used in every keto kitchen. Ghee is common in many countries and cuisines. It has a soft, nutty flavor and rich, creamy texture, making it versatile and delicious.

It is highly beneficial to your heart, gut, and skin and aiding weight loss.

Well, indulging in ghee doesn’t have to burn a hole in your pocket. Let us know how to make your own ghee.

  1. How to Make Your Own Ghee: The Traditional Way 

  • Heat the butter in a saucepan over the stove to make ghee. Allow boiling until the butter has fully melted. As the butter simmers, it will begin to foam and sputter; continue to swirl at this stage to prevent any burning at the bottom.
  • As it cooks, the color can shift from yellow color to somewhat brownish gray and then to a soft light golden.
  • Your ghee is ready when it becomes clean, stops frothing, and the milk solids at the base turn brownish-beige.
  • Allow for a few minutes of cooling before straining through a cheesecloth.
  • Store your ghee in an airtight jar, and enjoy!

 

  1. How To Make Your Own Ghee Without Cream

Don’t have any cream? Swap for salted or unsalted butter, and start directly from the stovetop.

To avoid the hassle, and jump straight to the creamy, nutty ghee-goodness, opt for organic, pocket-friendly, grass-fed ghee from Milkio Foods, New Zealand.


Why New Zealand?

“New Zealand is favored by nature when making milk, with a climate, soils, and abundant water that create a perfect environment for growing grass. Our cows can access pasture year-round, meaning space to roam and follow their natural inclinations to be outdoors. Our geography means New Zealand is free from many pests and diseases, supporting healthy cows and allowing us to farm with a lighter hand.”

Source: NZ story

Now Milkio ghee is available for online and offline purchases. To know more details on Milkio Grass-fed ghee online shopping counters, please Click here Milkio.



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