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Cooking with ghee – the figure-friendly fat

Cooking with ghee – the figure-friendly fat

Cooking with ghee – the figure-friendly fat

Traditional Indian ghee has a long list of surprising health benefits

I had a very juvenile moment on radio years ago with Pat Kenny when I was doing a segment on Indian food. I placed a large tub of ghee next to him, forcing him to say this colloquially rude word live on air. Pat, being the consummate broadcaster, went on to explain the etymology of the word and how the slang use of it came into being. It’s a Dublin thing!
Ghee, of course, is a traditional type of clarified butter used in Indian cuisine. Clarified butter is made by melting butter, discarding the dairy solids and just using the pure, clear fat that is left. Ghee goes through an extra step of gentle cooking to evaporate the moisture. It is rapidly gaining popularity with avid supporters of Paleo and low-carb high-fat (LCHF) diets and some even suggest taking ghee in your coffee to aid weight loss!

I don’t know if I’d go that far now, but ghee does have several health benefits and culinary uses that makes it an ingredient worth looking at.

Lactose free: When butter is melted to produce ghee, most of the dairy solids are discarded. This means that ghee is a pure fat with only trace amounts of lactose or casein. You can use ghee in the same way as you would regular butter, so it is the ideal substitute.

High smoke point: In culinary terms, the smoke point is the temperature at which fat starts to burn. Obviously, burnt flavours tarnish the taste and appearance of the dish. And from a health standpoint, burnt fats start to change into unhealthy compounds that are potentially carcinogenic. I would use ghee to sauté onions, and fry steak and pancakes.

Long shelf life: When ghee is produced, all the moisture is evaporated and the dairy solids are removed. The fat that is left is very stable and won’t go off if left at room temperature. It retains its original flavour and freshness for up to a year without refrigeration.
Fat busting: Ghee is a natural source of the essential fatty acid conjugated linolenic acid (CLA) found in animal fats. Bodybuilders often beef up on CLA or take supplements as studies show that it may improve the fat to lean muscle tissue ratio. One of its functions is that boosts the enzymes that help metabolise body fat and also resist new fat cells from forming.

Cancer fighting: Ghee contains cancer fighting CLA and butyric acid. Both have been shown to prevent and slow down certain types of cancers and tumour growth.
Vitamin rich: Ghee is rich is vitamin A, D, E and K which are vital for a healthy immune system, bones, brain, heart healthy and blood clotting.

Improves vitamin absorption: Ghee aids the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins and minerals from other foods. This has been a problem before in very low-fat diets. Aids digestive health: Ghee helps heal and restore the integrity of the gut lining. It reduces inflammation, has anti-viral properties and has been shown to be beneficial for sufferers of ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease.

Rozanne Stevens
Source : independent.ie

Grass Fed Ghee: What Are The Health Benefits?

What Are The Health Benefits Of Grass Fed Ghee?

Ayurveda claims that ghee has a host of health and cooking benefits and is beneficial for both the mind and the spirit. Ghee is made by a simple process of boiling butter and then removing the butterfat, leaving behind the proteins (casein and whey) and the milk solids (which includes lactose). This is known as clarified butter. If eaten in moderation, ghee can provide your body with higher concentrations of essential nutrients that aren’t available in butter.

Health Benefits of grass fed Ghee

Here is a list of important health benefits obtained by consuming ghee.

  1. High Smoke point: Since it cooks at a higher point than almost any other oil, the advantage is that it won’t break into free radicals like that in other oils. Free radicals can potentially be harmful to health, and when oils reach beyond their smoking point, it can be hazardous to a person’s respiratory system. Ghee also has a higher smoke point than butter.
  2. Reduce Risk Of Heart Disease: Ghee is rich in conjugated linoleic acid, or CLA, a fatty acid known to be protective against carcinogens, artery plaque, and diabetes. Because of this, researchers say ghee can be used to prevent cardiovascular disease.
  3. Weight Loss: When ghee is derived from grass-fed cows, the butter contains cancer-fighting fatty acid that aids in weight loss.
  4. Better Digestion: Ghee is rich in butyric acid. Beneficial intestinal bacteria convert fiber into butyric acid and then use that for energy and intestinal wall support. According to the author of Prescription of Nutritional Healing, butyric acid is “a monounsaturated fatty acid that reduces inflammatory conditions, reduces seepage of undigested food particles, and aids in the repair of the mucosal wall.”
  5. Lowers Cholesterol: Ghee is high in palmitic acid, which is artery-clogging. Studies have shown that ghee can reduce cholesterol both in the serum and intestine. This is done by triggering an increased secretion of biliary lipids.
  6. Skin: Ghee is known to purify the skin and give it an added glow. It acts as a natural moisturizer when used regularly. It’s also known to reduce burning sensation of the skin, heal scars, chicken pox scars and more.

Source : curejoy