Grass fed Ghee vs. butter: Which is better for Keto?

Grass fed ghee vs. Butter is a common dilemma for ketogenic diet users.

 

Since the inception of the ketogenic diet and the necessity of consuming fats for the best result, there has been a lot of debate on this topic, particularly within members of the Ketogenic (Keto) diet community.

But what’s the better option here and why?

 

Let’s compare ghee vs butter from different aspects.

Ghee and butter can be compared due to their general similarities; both being dairy products, almost same calorie count, containing good amounts of fats, and some similar nutrients. Now before going onto explain this ghee vs butter keto issue, we need to understand what a Keto diet is exactly.

 

What is a Keto diet?

A ketogenic diet is popularly known as keto diet. It is a popular and proven effective dieting scheme worldwide, where dieters are suggested to reduce their carbohydrate consumption and instead they need to focus on their protein and fat intake.

The Keto diet gained popularity due to its ability to lose body fat quickly. People suffering from obesity or with excess unwanted body fat, may see great benefits from trying out a Keto diet, provided there is no history of heart disease or hypertension.

This diet is based on the theory of ketosis, where the human body doesn’t use the Citric Acid Cycle due to a lack of glucose from carbohydrates. So essentially the Keto diet is a high-fat, high-protein and low-carb diet, the reduction of carbohydrates induces the state of ketosis. As quality fat intake is a vital issue of this diet and both ghee and butter contain loads of fats, the question of butter vs. ghee is an important issue for the users.

Why grass fed ghee is preferred for the Keto diet: 

Healthier option: ghee or butter

Ghee is a great substitute to regular butter that contains substantial amounts to lactose, because it is stripped from milk solids during the clarification process, leaving only healthy butter fats behind as residue. While it is a much healthier alternative to regular butter, it is still a kind of fat.

Grass fed ghee vs. Butter:  Grass fed cow ghee is known to be called the “better butter”.

There are many reasons why it called:

  • Ghee contains more fat per gram than butter: one TBSP of ghee contains 14g fat compared to 12g in butter.
  • Ghee offers a higher smoke point than butter: 485°F (252°C) versus 350°F (177°C) for butter, which makes clarified butter a safer choice for cooking.
  • Cow ghee offers better shelf life: Grass fed ghee is more shelf stable and can be preserved without refrigeration, saving you fridge space, which is not applicable for butter. You need to preserve butter in fridge.
  • Grass fed Ghee is suitable for those that are lactose intolerant: Ghee is clarified butter, so all the milk solids and proteins are filtered out. Many individuals with a lactose allergy can consume ghee fine but not butter.
  • Grass fed organic Ghee contains vitamins, butyrate, and CLAs which are gut friendly and good for your health.
  • Ghee contains Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCTs) and this is excellent in providing high energy levels and helps with cognitive functioning.

If you are targeting to consume the right kinds of fats and provide yourself with energy on a keto diet, cow ghee is a better choice than butter.

 

How to use grass fed cow ghee in Keto diet: Grass fed Butter vs Ghee

Ghee is a versatile cooking ingredient and adapts well to most of the cuisines. Keto dieters have reported that grass fed cow ghee has a more flavorsome taste over regular butter itself.

 

The common uses of ghee are:

  • Cooking: Replace ghee 1:1 in place of the cooking oils and butters you use now. Use ghee for stir-frying, sautéing, barbequing, roasting, baking, etc.
  • Spices: Ghee is known to make spices, i.e. Garlic, more flavoursome. Fry some garlic in ghee before adding veggies or meat, and witness the intense aromas given off.
  • Hot drinks: Add a spoonful of ghee into your morning coffee, tea or hot chocolate for a fast energy boost.

 

Benefits of ghee vs Butter: WHY ghee is good for keto diet ultimately

Overall, grass fed cow ghee if consumed in moderation, can work as a feel-good and everyday staple in your diet.  Replace the current fats in your diet with ghee’s good fats, and watch your keto diet work fantastically.’

 

Ghee Composition and its role in the ketogenic diet

Ghee Composition and its role in the ketogenic diet is quite unique. A tablespoon of ghee has 14 grams of fat to butter’s 12 grams, and about a gram more of monounsaturated and saturated fats, the good fats, which brings us to MCTs. The ketogenic diet and MCTs also help in cancer prevention.

 

Ghee vs butter: ghee does not have the trace of casein

This is the biggest difference between butter and ghee and might be a trump card for you if you’re allergic to dairy protein. Butter is mostly fat and water, but it still has trace amounts of casein and lactose, the two compounds in dairy that most often cause allergies and sensitivities. Casein provides butter its silky creaminess.

 

It can also cause symptoms like:

  • Rashes
  • Puffing, coughing, asthmatic symptoms
  • Itching of skin.
  • Abdominal pain.
  • Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, etc.

 

Ghee has little to no casein or lactose, meaning even dairy-sensitive people can usually consume it. It blends into Bulletproof Coffee well and is a decent substitute for butter in most of the recipes, although it’s oilier than butter and may change the texture of a dish slightly. 

If you do prepare bulletproof coffee with ghee, certainly it won’t foam the way butter does so your expectation for getting a frothy latte top my not come true. But still its tasty and energetic, may be better than butter made variety.

 

Ghee vs. Butter: What’s the Difference?

For users, ghee and butter are made up of diverse components. Butter on its own is included of butterfat (roiled from cream), water, and milk solids. Ghee, which is reduced from butter, is only made up of butterfat.

 

Unlike butter, ghee, and other types of clarified butter comprises no lactose and are very low in casein content, which makes them an perfect substitute to regular butter for those with dairy and lactose intolerance. However, sometimes ghee may contain trace amounts of casein and lactose, so it should still be evaded if you’re truly allergic or insensitive.

 

Ghee can be used in different recipes that need solid fats, such as butter or coconut oil. However, ghee offers slightly nutty taste, which may enhance flavor of cooking —in a different way.

Ghee vs. butter for keto diet should not be decided on its taste or for the fat content only. The utility of ghee is best assessed if all the ghee benefits are analyzed.  Ghee offers good fats and its vitamin and antioxidant content is helpful for maintaining a good balance of energy, endurance, and immunity of body. 

The success of keto diet largely depends on the quality fat intake and life style modification. With proper lifestyle and moderate ghee in diet, the rate of success of ketogenic diet gets obviously boosted.

A 21st century analysis at grass fed ghee

A 21st century analysis at grass fed ghee

A 21st century analysis at grass fed ghee – Ayurvedic elixir or heart disease aggravator?

Grass fed ghee is procured from 100% grass fed cow milk and it is a kitchen staple. Nowadays health freaks and diet freaks are considering cow ghee as one of the best ingredients for natural health management including healthy weightless assistance, anti-ageing treatment of skin, constipation remedy, etc.

Loaded with heaps of saturated fats, it was a recurring stigma about ghee in recent past that it is unhealthy for heart and a definite trigger for obesity and cholesterol.

But what has made the difference and what is the basic point behind this changed notion about grass fed cow ghee? Is it really a dairy elixir or a fat inducer? Let’s explore.

Myth: Ghee is difficult to digest

Fact: Cow ghee aids in smooth digestion

It is wrongly apprehended that grass fed ghee is difficult to digest hence in recent past ghee was counted as a restricted product in healthy cooking. Modern research has explored that fact that moderate consumption of cow ghee aids in better and faster digestion and it keeps colon healthy robust due to healthy fatty acid chains in it.

Furthermore, Ghee’s properties helps in taking care of the digestive tract by lubricating, alleviate hardness in bowels, and reduce flatulence and bloating. It has natural ability of alleviating constipation and that makes digestive track clean and healthy.

Myth: Ghee adds extra weight in body

Fact: Ghee helps in losing weight.

Cow ghee is loaded with saturated fats: besides, grass fed ghee contains butyric acid and medium chain triglycerides, which reduce stubborn body fat. According to famous nutritionist Rujuta Diwekar, “Ghee is loaded with essential amino acids that aid in organizing the fat and compel the fat cells to get reduced in size.” So, if you want to reduce fat speedily, you may add ghee to the weight loss diet plan.

Myth:  increases lots of cholesterol

Fact: ghee aids in supplying HDL cholesterol hence regulated cholesterol

It was popularly believed that grass fed ghee tends to increase blood cholesterol, which can be fatal for heart health. Recent research on Ghee and its fat content has revealed the fact that grass fed ghee can shrink blood cholesterol count by triggering an enlarged excretion of biliary lipids.

Despite the bad reputation, saturated fats are necessary as they help in boosting general immunity of human body and keep viral infections mostly away.

Regular and restricted consumption of cow ghee can keep LDL cholesterol under control if you practice exercise, follow healthy diet, and enjoy adequate rest at night. Ghee is a lavish source of healthy Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids, which decrease LDL cholesterol.

Myth: Ghee is harmful for cardiovascular health

Fact: Pure cow ghee intake in moderation can improve cardio health

Modern dieticians are recommending restricted intake of cow ghee for patients of cardio vascular disease (CVD). Cow ghee containing 65% of saturated fats, which is mostly short chain fatty acids. According to study long chain fatty acid, as found in red meet, are more responsible for inducing problems like blood clotting and thrombosis. Till date short chain fatty acids are not found linked to CVD diseases.

Those have already developed cardiac diseases should consume cow ghee is restricted amount in place of normal cooking oil because grass fed cow ghee is safer for CVD diet.

These are the prime health benefits of grass fed ghee according to modern research, which is completely opposite to old myths about cow ghee.

However, you need to use best quality cow ghee for enjoying best weight loss benefits and CVD prevention.

You can trust Milkio grass fed ghee as Milkio cow ghee is made of 100% grass fed cow milk by using latest tools and hygienic production process.

Benefits of a Ketogenic Diet

Benefits of a Ketogenic Diet

Benefits of a Ketogenic Diet:

Keto wouldn’t be so popular if it didn’t have benefits–and there are many of them.

Blood sugar and insulin levels improve:

As ketogenic diets cut out sugar and carbohydrates, blood sugar levels tend to fall. In recent times, many people with diabetes are successfully managing their condition using a keto plan.

Effortless dieting:

Have you ever tried a low-fat diet before? If you have, you may remember how difficult it can be to control food cravings.  However, keto diets encourage satiety due to their higher fat and protein content .

Massive reductions in triglycerides: 

Triglycerides are one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Carbohydrate restriction leads to lower triglyceride levels.

Keto helps manage brain-related diseases and illnesses:

Ketogenic diets can be therapeutic for a variety of brain conditions, whether severe chronic diseases or mild problems. Research shows that being in ketosis has potential benefits for brain tumor cases, depression, epilepsy, and migraines

Significant increase in HDL levels:

Lower intake of carbohydrate combined with higher fat consumption tends to increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels. Cardiovascular researchers accept that higher HDL levels are protective against heart disease.

Leads to greater weight loss than other diets:

In several studies directly comparing low-carb and low-fat diets, diets low in carbohydrate promote more significant weight loss. This weight loss is likely due to greater satiety from foods higher in fat and protein.

May protect against some cancers:

Cancer cells have a preference for glucose to fuel growth. And while they can still grow in carbohydrate-restricted conditions, some studies suggest that ketogenic diets may help prevent/fight certain cancers. At present, clinical trials are ongoing .

Note: This is still very early science and there is no clear evidence on the topic. No diet should be considered as an alternative to conventional treatment.

Possible benefits for Alzheimer’s disease:

Further research is necessary, but ketogenic diets may help by supplying the brain with ketones, which it can use for energy. Alzheimer’s patients have impaired glucose metabolism, and studies show ketone levels positively correlate with memory performance and cognition.

Reduction in blood pressure:

High blood pressure (hypertension) is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease and stroke. Conventional advice may over-estimate the impact of salt, and excessive refined carbohydrate intake has a larger effect on blood pressure than sodium.

Ketogenic diets naturally reduce refined carb consumption, and many following such diets experience a decrease in blood pressure

It’s enjoyable, and it’s sustainable:

And this last one’s pretty obvious. What sounds more appealing to you: low-fat crackers, skim milk, and a fat-trimmed chicken breast? Or steak, cheese, and some dark chocolate?

Key Point: Ketogenic diets have a lot of potential health benefits, but we shouldn’t claim them to be a cure-all solution. Keto is also very sustainable because most of the food tastes delicious.

By Michael Joseph, MSc

A closer look at the low-carb, high-fat ketogenic diet

A closer look at the low-carb, high-fat ketogenic diet, including side effects and concerns

It has been called, among other names, the modified Paleo diet, Atkins and Primal diet, but for many people eager to slim down, the ketogenic diet has emerged as a favourite. But it does have its critics.

There’s been a lot of interest in the ketogenic diet over the past five years. Prominent celebrities have tried it, including basketball superstar LeBron James, who was on the diet for 67 days in 2014 and lost 9 kilograms, his 6-foot 7-inch frame emerging a whole lot leaner than it had been going in. Other stars include Matthew McConaughey, Adriana Lima, Gwyneth Paltrow, Megan Fox, Tim McGraw and Robin Wright. With well-known individuals such as these jumping on the ketogenic bandwagon, it’s no surprise the diet gained popularity.

The ketogenic diet involves eating primarily fats and proteins, while restricting carbohydrates. But, not all types of fat are on the menu. Preference is given to monounsaturated fats (such as avocado, macadamia nuts and olive oil) and polyunsaturated omega-3s that are found in animal sources such as fatty fish and seafood. Healthier types of saturated fats (such as ghee, butter and coconut oil) are also allowed, but not factory-farmed meat and fish, or trans-fats.

This is combined with a restriction of carbohydrates, including complex carbohydrates, such as wholegrains, and all kinds of sugar (simple carbohydrates), such as soft drinks and fruit.

Carbohydrates are replaced by extra protein in the form of meats, fish, cheese and tofu. Seeds, low-carb, high-fibre fruits such as raspberries, and high-fibre, low-starch vegetables such as spinach and broccoli help to add fibre to the diet.

Over the years, the ketogenic diet has been called many things: the modified Paleo diet, the Atkins diet, the LCHF (low-carb, high-fat) diet, and the Primal diet. At its core, however, the ketogenic diet simply uses a scientific principle called ketosis – a metabolic state in which the body uses fat instead of glycogen (the form in which carbohydrates are stored in the body) as the primary source of energy. This, in turn, creates weight loss.

Once the body’s glycogen supply dries up, it starts breaking down fat to produce ketones in the liver, which are then used as energy. Since insulin is produced to regulate the glucose levels in the blood, low-carb diets may improve the body’s insulin sensitivity and reduce insulin resistance, one of the major causes of diabetes.

Dubai-based entrepreneur, 25-year-old Safwan Sabqi, lost 11 kilograms in the first month of following a ketogenic diet. “I had a high body-fat percentage, and weight loss depends on metabolism which can vary and be restrictive, depending on one’s body. But I had never seen this kind of success with any other diet before,” Sabqi says.

In the next two months, Sabqi lost 13 more kilograms, bringing his total weight loss to 24kg in three months. “I did break the diet a few times by eating high-carb foods – they’re really tough to resist – but I also worked out diligently for 20 minutes a day,” he adds.

While Sabqi practised the diet unsupervised, relying entirely on information from the internet, experts warn against this. Professor Thomas N Seyfried from Boston College, who has extensively researched the diet, urges people to be cautious. “Ketogenic diets can be very unhealthy if consumed in excess amounts. Excess consumption causes dyslipidemia [an unhealthy alteration of blood lipid parameters] and insulin insensitivity,” says Seyfried. Without supervision, there is a very real danger of nutritional imbalance, which can lead to hair loss, fatigue and muscle wastage, he explains.

The causes of nutritional imbalances are varied – too much fat and too little protein, consumption of unhealthy fats, malnutrition, lack of calcium due to restricted dairy intake and not getting enough fibre, to name a few. Individual factors need to be considered too: serious exercisers and athletes need a certain amount of carbohydrates for good muscle health. Since vegetarians have few protein sources in the absence of legumes, this poses another challenge that requires careful monitoring.

As is the case with any diet that restricts certain food groups, there are experts who champion it and others who are sceptical about its practicality and potential long-term consequences. Clinical dietitian, Mitun De Sarkar, managing director of Simply Healthy Foods in Dubai, does not subscribe to the ketogenic diet philosophy. “In my 15 years of experience, I have learnt that all forms of restrictive diets only result in a short-term weight loss,” she says. “The body expels water to adjust to the ‘shock’ to the system, but the results are temporary. The lost weight is usually regained – with interest – as soon as one goes off it, since the body tries to latch on to all the nutrients it was deprived of in the restrictive diets.”

Dr Graham Simpson, founder of the Dubai preventive medicine, healthcare company Intelligent Health, feels differently and says the diet is safe. “It can be done by most people – unless they suffer from renal failure – and is the single best way to lose weight,” he says.

Simpson dismisses concerns about the ketogenic diet being unhealthy and drastic. “There are many people who don’t know the difference between physiological ketosis – the healthy production of ketones due to dietary alterations – and pathological ketoacidosis, which is a metabolic derangement seen in type 1 diabetes and is very dangerous,” says Simpson. “Apart from weight loss, the diet can help with other health issues such as epilepsy, sleep disorders, diabetes, polycystic ovary syndrome, acne and many others,” he adds.

But there are side effects: bad breath, mood swings and the possibility of dehydration. The production of ketones results in terrible breath, and since the brain is designed to receive 90 per cent of its energy from carbs, its deprivation can cause mood swings, especially in the initial weeks while the body is adjusting. Additionally, a person on a low-carb diet needs to increase their water intake. Since each gram of glycogen is accompanied by a few grams of water, in the absence of glycogen, there is the risk of dehydration.

Though both Seyfried and Simpson declare the diet safe, it is advisable for certain individuals to refrain from it, including those with renal failure or pancreatic insufficiencies (since it makes digestion of fats more difficult), as well as people who have had bariatric surgery. Anyone considering a major dietary change should consult their doctor or a registered dietitian.

Source : thenational

What is the Difference Between Ketosis and Ketoacidosis?

What is the Difference Between Ketosis and Ketoacidosis?

What is the Difference Between Ketosis and Ketoacidosis?

When you’re on a ketogenic diet, your body will go into a state of ketosis, which is the metabolic state that occurs when your body uses ketones as its primary energy source instead of glucose.

During ketosis, your body breaks down fat to use as energy instead of using carbohydrates for energy (as normally happens when you eat food containing carbohydrates).

If you’re looking to burn fat, then ketosis can be a very good thing, since it’s forcing your body to burn fat as fuel, often the fat that you have stored in your body!

KETOACIDOSIS:

Ketoacidosis, on the other hand, is a very serious condition that typically occurs in type 1 diabetics (and very rarely in end-stage type 2 diabetics). In ketoacidosis, the body doesn’t get enough insulin, which causes the body to believe that it’s short on glucose – when in actuality, there’s a lot of glucose in the blood that just can’t get into the cells. Because of that, the body starts producing ketones, which results in very high blood ketone levels at the same time as very high blood sugar levels.

This is a highly dangerous situation, and patients with ketoacidosis may fall into dangerous comas.

Can I Lose Weight On A Ketogenic Diet? And Are There Other Benefits?

This is probably the question you care most about – can you lose weight on a ketogenic diet?

There are many reasons why a ketogenic diet could perhaps help you lose weight (and many of these reasons are similar to the reasons why low carb and Paleo diets work):

1. KETOSIS ALLOWS YOUR BODY TO BURN FAT

When your body is in ketosis (which occurs when you’re eating a ketogenic diet – but note that a low carb or Paleo diet could also be a ketogenic diet!), your body is primed to burn fat as your energy source (rather than glucose). While some of that fat will come from fat you eat (and you have to eat quite a bit of fat to get into ketosis), some of it will likely also come from your body’s fat stores. And burning your body’s fat stores is exactly what everyone looking to lose weight needs.

In particular, if you have what’s called “poor metabolic flexibility,” your body may not be very good at switching back and forth between burning carbs and burning fat for energy. If that’s the case, then the most common result is that you don’t burn much fat at all, you get cravings for sugar and carbs, and you have a hard time losing weight. A ketogenic diet is not the only or even a perfect answer to this problem, but it is a good answer. By eating a ketogenic diet, you force your body to burn fat, and you don’t switch back and forth, so your body stays in fat-burning mode all the time.

2. LESS HUNGER

I still remember when I used to count calories. I would be constantly hungry – my salads wouldn’t satiate me, and toast would just make me hungrier! I used to go to sleep hungry and upset that even with so much effort, I still managed to ingest at least 1600 calories.

What I didn’t know back then was that my diet was actually making me hungrier. What generally happens is that when we mix carbohydrates and fats in the same meal, we want more. It’s the reason that you could eat cake or cookies until you’re sick (they contain lots of sugar and butter), but you usually won’t do the same with steak (which is mostly protein with some fat).

Also, remember how I talked about “poor metabolic flexibility” above? Well, if you have poor metabolic flexibility, then eating carbohydrates is almost always going to make you hungry an hour or two after a meal.

So while you’re eating more calorie-dense fats on a ketogenic diet, most people find that they end up eating less overall (in terms of calories). And they’re less hungry (which usually also means they’re happier and less moody).

Generally, if you’re less hungry when you’re on a diet, you’re more likely to stick to that diet, and so the chances of losing weight is higher.

3. A KETOGENIC DIET MAY SOLVE OTHER HEALTH PROBLEMS

One aspect of losing weight that many people don’t talk about is that your existing health conditions may be making it really tough to lose weight.

That may well be why your friend or spouse can do a diet for a month and drop 20 pounds while you gain 5 pounds eating the same diet. It’s not that you’re doing anything wrong with the diet, and there may not even be anything wrong with that diet (for weight-loss purposes), but there may be some underlying health conditions with your body that’s making your body cling onto that extra weight.

A ketogenic diet may help certain health conditions (like type 2 diabetes, gut dysbiosis, sleep disorders, fatigue, etc.) that may make it easier for you to lose weight. There’s also research into using a ketogenic diet to cure/prevent cancer and brain disorders like Alzheimer’s.

Source : paleomagazine

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