Grass fed Ghee vs. butter: Which is better for Keto?

Grass fed ghee vs. Butter is a common dilemma for ketogenic diet users.

 

Since the inception of the ketogenic diet and the necessity of consuming fats for the best result, there has been a lot of debate on this topic, particularly within members of the Ketogenic (Keto) diet community.

But what’s the better option here and why?

 

Let’s compare ghee vs butter from different aspects.

Ghee and butter can be compared due to their general similarities; both being dairy products, almost same calorie count, containing good amounts of fats, and some similar nutrients. Now before going onto explain this ghee vs butter keto issue, we need to understand what a Keto diet is exactly.

 

What is a Keto diet?

A ketogenic diet is popularly known as keto diet. It is a popular and proven effective dieting scheme worldwide, where dieters are suggested to reduce their carbohydrate consumption and instead they need to focus on their protein and fat intake.

The Keto diet gained popularity due to its ability to lose body fat quickly. People suffering from obesity or with excess unwanted body fat, may see great benefits from trying out a Keto diet, provided there is no history of heart disease or hypertension.

This diet is based on the theory of ketosis, where the human body doesn’t use the Citric Acid Cycle due to a lack of glucose from carbohydrates. So essentially the Keto diet is a high-fat, high-protein and low-carb diet, the reduction of carbohydrates induces the state of ketosis. As quality fat intake is a vital issue of this diet and both ghee and butter contain loads of fats, the question of butter vs. ghee is an important issue for the users.

Why grass fed ghee is preferred for the Keto diet: 

Healthier option: ghee or butter

Ghee is a great substitute to regular butter that contains substantial amounts to lactose, because it is stripped from milk solids during the clarification process, leaving only healthy butter fats behind as residue. While it is a much healthier alternative to regular butter, it is still a kind of fat.

Grass fed ghee vs. Butter:  Grass fed cow ghee is known to be called the “better butter”.

There are many reasons why it called:

  • Ghee contains more fat per gram than butter: one TBSP of ghee contains 14g fat compared to 12g in butter.
  • Ghee offers a higher smoke point than butter: 485°F (252°C) versus 350°F (177°C) for butter, which makes clarified butter a safer choice for cooking.
  • Cow ghee offers better shelf life: Grass fed ghee is more shelf stable and can be preserved without refrigeration, saving you fridge space, which is not applicable for butter. You need to preserve butter in fridge.
  • Grass fed Ghee is suitable for those that are lactose intolerant: Ghee is clarified butter, so all the milk solids and proteins are filtered out. Many individuals with a lactose allergy can consume ghee fine but not butter.
  • Grass fed organic Ghee contains vitamins, butyrate, and CLAs which are gut friendly and good for your health.
  • Ghee contains Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCTs) and this is excellent in providing high energy levels and helps with cognitive functioning.

If you are targeting to consume the right kinds of fats and provide yourself with energy on a keto diet, cow ghee is a better choice than butter.

 

How to use grass fed cow ghee in Keto diet: Grass fed Butter vs Ghee

Ghee is a versatile cooking ingredient and adapts well to most of the cuisines. Keto dieters have reported that grass fed cow ghee has a more flavorsome taste over regular butter itself.

 

The common uses of ghee are:

  • Cooking: Replace ghee 1:1 in place of the cooking oils and butters you use now. Use ghee for stir-frying, sautéing, barbequing, roasting, baking, etc.
  • Spices: Ghee is known to make spices, i.e. Garlic, more flavoursome. Fry some garlic in ghee before adding veggies or meat, and witness the intense aromas given off.
  • Hot drinks: Add a spoonful of ghee into your morning coffee, tea or hot chocolate for a fast energy boost.

 

Benefits of ghee vs Butter: WHY ghee is good for keto diet ultimately

Overall, grass fed cow ghee if consumed in moderation, can work as a feel-good and everyday staple in your diet.  Replace the current fats in your diet with ghee’s good fats, and watch your keto diet work fantastically.’

 

Ghee Composition and its role in the ketogenic diet

Ghee Composition and its role in the ketogenic diet is quite unique. A tablespoon of ghee has 14 grams of fat to butter’s 12 grams, and about a gram more of monounsaturated and saturated fats, the good fats, which brings us to MCTs. The ketogenic diet and MCTs also help in cancer prevention.

 

Ghee vs butter: ghee does not have the trace of casein

This is the biggest difference between butter and ghee and might be a trump card for you if you’re allergic to dairy protein. Butter is mostly fat and water, but it still has trace amounts of casein and lactose, the two compounds in dairy that most often cause allergies and sensitivities. Casein provides butter its silky creaminess.

 

It can also cause symptoms like:

  • Rashes
  • Puffing, coughing, asthmatic symptoms
  • Itching of skin.
  • Abdominal pain.
  • Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, etc.

 

Ghee has little to no casein or lactose, meaning even dairy-sensitive people can usually consume it. It blends into Bulletproof Coffee well and is a decent substitute for butter in most of the recipes, although it’s oilier than butter and may change the texture of a dish slightly. 

If you do prepare bulletproof coffee with ghee, certainly it won’t foam the way butter does so your expectation for getting a frothy latte top my not come true. But still its tasty and energetic, may be better than butter made variety.

 

Ghee vs. Butter: What’s the Difference?

For users, ghee and butter are made up of diverse components. Butter on its own is included of butterfat (roiled from cream), water, and milk solids. Ghee, which is reduced from butter, is only made up of butterfat.

 

Unlike butter, ghee, and other types of clarified butter comprises no lactose and are very low in casein content, which makes them an perfect substitute to regular butter for those with dairy and lactose intolerance. However, sometimes ghee may contain trace amounts of casein and lactose, so it should still be evaded if you’re truly allergic or insensitive.

 

Ghee can be used in different recipes that need solid fats, such as butter or coconut oil. However, ghee offers slightly nutty taste, which may enhance flavor of cooking —in a different way.

Ghee vs. butter for keto diet should not be decided on its taste or for the fat content only. The utility of ghee is best assessed if all the ghee benefits are analyzed.  Ghee offers good fats and its vitamin and antioxidant content is helpful for maintaining a good balance of energy, endurance, and immunity of body. 

The success of keto diet largely depends on the quality fat intake and life style modification. With proper lifestyle and moderate ghee in diet, the rate of success of ketogenic diet gets obviously boosted.

Meet The Startup Churning A Profit From Ghee, A Better For You Butter

Meet The Startup Churning A Profit From Ghee, A Better For You Butter

From grains like farro and quinoa to fermented fare like sauerkraut and kimchi, it’s no secret that “ancient” foods are making a resurgence on modern menus. But that leaves diners wondering, what’s the next age-old ingredient that will be made new again? One founder has her money on ghee. Raquel Tavares Gunsagar launched her company, Fourth & Heart, two and a half years ago to sell her ancient butter alternative to contemporary consumers. For Tavares, timing proved critical. She introduced her product to the market just as America’s obsession with healthy fats, like avocado and coconut oil, was heating up.

After presenting at Expo West in 2015, she captured investor attention and secured a deal with leading organic and natural foods distributor UNFI. Just over a year out from launch and one rebrand later, Fourth & Heart closed a $1 million Series A on crowdfunding site CircleUp, lead by an anonymous private investor. The company, started with $80,000 of her personal savings, did $2.2 million in revenue in 2016, Tavares tells FORBES. “I had an idea and I didn’t know how fast it was going to take off,” says Tavares, who admits that she was surprised by how quickly her product was picked up by retailers. “We were in a small category and the idea was just starting to trend.” Since then, it’s become more mainstream.

Her ghee is now sold in 6,000 points of distribution including chains like Kroger, Whole Foods, Giant Eagle and Central Market. She’s hoping to launch in Target stores in 2017. “I see it picking up the most right now,” she says of the self-staple pantry item.

Why bring ghee back? Ghee, a type of clarified butter, dates back thousands of years to ancient India. It appears in the Indian holy text the Bhagavad Gita and was (and is) still used for religious rituals, as an alternative medicine, and, most commonly, as a staple item in diets and core to cooking many dishes.

Tavares became familiar with ghee at an early age because her mother worked as a registered dietitian and a practitioner of Ayurveda medicine, an ancient and holistic Indian healing system which uses ghee for treatments. When Tavares left her job in marketing, later teaming up with cofounder Lillian Wunsch, she considered what food item she could start a business around and put her unique stamp on. She looked at what had been done with yogurt and peanut butter, and after reflecting on her own experience, ghee became a natural fit. She launched using first her own savings and later a $135,000 friends and family round under the name Tava.

She knew her business was going after the formidable butter market, which produces over 100 million pounds of the spread each month, with big players like Land O’Lakes leading in market share. But, Ghee falls in a category just outside of it, as a butter replacement, like coconut oil. Nevertheless, the subcategory is expanding. According to industry experts, Ghee is the fastest growing category in the nearly $10 billion butter and butter replacement industry.

Why choose ghee over butter? Ghee differs from regular butter in a few key ways. It has a high smoke point, meaning unlike butter or coconut oil, it doesn’t easily burn when heated. It’s naturally spreadable, so it doesn’t need to be softened first and it also doesn’t need to be refrigerated. Ghee is lactose-free because it doesn’t contain any milk solids, which are filtered out during the cooking process. While it doesn’t lower cholesterol, it doesn’t add to it, and is high in fat soluble vitamins A, D and E.

While other, larger, companies like Organic Valley sell ghee, Tavares says no one else offers flavored options. Her variations on the original include Himalayan Pink Salt and White Truffle Salt, among others. Tavares says her product has been showcased by companies, like Whole Foods, that note ghee as a growing trend. This good press has been critical in reaching millennials, and, she says, has helped her take “about 11-14% of existing competition” in the category.

Fourth & Heart ghee is currently sold in glass jars, but, in March, Tavares will unveil a new line of sprays, pourable ghee and single-serving portions.

Looking ahead Although, generally speaking, food trends are fickle at best, Tavares has high hopes for her brand in 2017. “This year is exciting because it’s the year our brand will become a household name,” she says. She’s intent on educating consumers about the many virtues of ghee by going into grocery stores and conveying the brand message and story directly to buyers. In terms of financials for 2017, she looking to raise more money and, “in a perfect world, we’d double our revenue.” Natalie Sportelli , FORBES STAFF