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5 Ways Low Carb Lifestyles Help You To Lose Weight Without Starving.

5 Ways Low Carb Lifestyles Help You To Lose Weight Without Starving.

Low carb diets are common in the weight loss spectrum. Many studies have shown them to result in more weight lost as compared to the standard low fat diet plan.

Going on a low carb diets has so many health benefits, including the fact that they are highly effective at eliminating visceral fat, such as that in the belly, a most dangerous type of body fat.  

There have been so many speculations, thoughts and ideas on why low carb diets are effective for weight loss, hopefully this article will bring some clarity.

What Exactly Is A Low Carb Diet?

A low carb diet is a system of eating where carbohydrates are drastically or significantly, cut from the diet, and in the strictest plans, like the Ketogenic diet, carb intake is limited to non-starchy vegetables and some dairy. When ones diet contains fewer carbohydrates, the body no longer gets its energy from the glucose they produce and instead begins to burn fat for energy.

Starch and sugar carbohydrates are substituted with healthy fats and a moderate protein intake. Sugar, pastries, pasta, bread, cereal, beans, or any other starches are no longer allowed, as you will indulge vegetables, fatty foods such as Ghee, butter, fatty fish, oils and some dairy along with eggs, steak, chicken, seafood and other protein sources.

How Does It Aid Weight Loss?

  1. Triggers Ketosis: Eating a low carb diet triggers a process known as ketosis, which is where the body begins to burn fat for energy instead of dietary carbs, which is a very efficient way to burn fat stores and lose weight.
  2. Eliminates water weight: People who have gone on low carb diet typically lose quite a bit of weight in the first two weeks, likely, this occurs when water that is tied to glycogen comes off the body and is actually a quite encouraging event that supports the continuation of a healthy lifestyle.
  3. Eliminates insulin trigger foods: Starch and sugar carbs are insulin triggers that cause blood sugar spikes that lead to weight gain. While on a low carb diet, these insulin triggers are eliminated so the body can burn fat instead of storing it.  
  4. They are high in protein: Protein helps keep you full and satisfied so you naturally eat less, it also helps to increase lean muscle mass that promotes fat burning. This is one of the factors that make low carb diets effective.
  5. Regulates the appetite and naturally reduces calorie intake: A low carb diet naturally regulates the appetite because all those insulin triggers foods that wreak havoc in the blood stream to cause erratic hunger and out of control cravings are eliminated.

    Additionally, Researches from St. Louis and Japan (Banks WA1, Coon AB, Robinson SM, Moinuddin A, Shultz JM, Nakaoke R, Morley JE, et all) found that the hunger regulating hormone leptin is positively affected by the low carb diet’s ability to reduce triglyceride levels in the body, which allows that hormone to work more effectively in regulating the appetite.

When people embark on a low carb diet, their appetite significantly drops naturally, and they naturally feel satisfied with less food, resulting in weight loss as they naturally eat less calories and without suffering and starvation.

Are Low Carb Diets Safe?

This is a frequently asked question, which is common amongst people wanting to embark on a low carb journey. The low carb experience is not for everyone, though it is followed by thousands of people around the world, without any problems.  

  • It may have side effects for some, while others may experience nothing. Usually any side effects are short lived. In general, statics and research shows them to be highly effective for weight loss, and to also reduce risks for cardiovascular disease better than low fat eating plans.
  • Make sure you understand what a particular low carb diet has to offer before choosing it.  
  • In conclusion, low carb diets aids weight loss by triggering ketosis, a metabolic state where the body uses stored fat as its source of energy. 
  • Low carb diets also do a great job of regulating appetite and naturally allow those following them to eat less, while feeling satisfied and this is another one of the main reasons that the weight loss is so strong and visible.
  • Low carb diets are not fads, but lifestyles that have helped thousands of people reverse obesity and improve their health. It may just do the same for you.

Stay well and take care!

Lean and lovin’ it

Lean and lovin’ it

Lean and lovin’ it: Butter’s back on top, but ghee is bigger and better

In this column’s early years I created a fat-free chocolate cake that I showcased on Good Morning America. Nonfat yogurt did a decent job as butter’s stand-in, even though my cake lacked butter’s big flavor impact.

Due to all its fat, as well as that cholesterol thing, I was certain I’d never get to enjoy butter again. Looking back it’s difficult to understand how so many of us learned to fear butter. For some, even today, fear’s still the correct word.

Flash forward to the 21st century where butter starred on the cover of Time magazine’s June 23, 2014, issue with the headline: “Eat Butter. Scientists labeled fat the enemy. Why they were wrong.”

Wrong? After more studies and other studies re-evaluated; it sure seems so.

We all considered saturated fats and cholesterol the “baddies,” and many of us who regularly wrote about fats spanked those “baddies” all the time; using lard, coconut oil and butter as the foods we should all avoid.

I admit it; I missed butter. Oh, did I miss it. Nothing filled the crevices of an English muffin like melted butter or topped hot popped corn quite so well. Poundcake didn’t taste as good with a butter substitute, like margarine.

Since that Time issue, butter’s been back in a big way. That doesn’t mean consuming butter in unlimited quantities like the folks years ago who used to eat a pound of bacon for an Atkins’ high-protein, high-fat breakfast. No. And, it doesn’t mean that all butters, no matter the source or type, are good for us.

The current thinking: the best butter that may promote health is butter produced from all grass-fed cow’s milk. Also, better butter should be unsalted and certified organic.

My favorites these days are Anchor brand butter from New Zealand (anchorbutter.com), followed closely by Kerrygold brand Irish butter (kerry gold usa.com). Both widely available here and reasonably priced for their quality.

After exploring butter that gives the edge to being healthy, I discovered ghee; a form of butter that’s supposed to be almost miraculously healthy. I’d never really tasted ghee with intention; until now.

First issue: where to get ghee and not just any ghee; ghee that’s organic and made from milk from pastured, all grass-fed cows? Of course I headed to the internet and was fortunate to find a 32 ounce bottle of Vital Ghee brand ghee on Amazon ($42.75). Fortunately a little ghee goes a long way.

My first taste of “Vital Ghee’s” ghee literally astounded me, the buttery flavor almost exploding on my tongue. “This is what butter’s supposed to taste like,” I said out loud. My mind raced thinking about all the possibilities: brownies, cakes, sauces, sautéing, whipped potatoes.

Ghee’s actually butter oil because the water and milk solids that make butter, butter has been removed. Without the milk solids, ghee can safely be used to saute, because it has a very high smoke point (485 degrees — olive oil’s smoke point’s 405; butter’s 350). Ghee needs no refrigeration; store it at a cool room temperature. See, amazing.

My chocolate zucchini bread recipe has appeared here before; using olive oil for shortening. Using ghee creates a better texture and a bigger, butter flavor. Give it a try.

Daily Herald Correspondent

Meet The Startup Churning A Profit From Ghee, A Better For You Butter

Meet The Startup Churning A Profit From Ghee, A Better For You Butter

From grains like farro and quinoa to fermented fare like sauerkraut and kimchi, it’s no secret that “ancient” foods are making a resurgence on modern menus. But that leaves diners wondering, what’s the next age-old ingredient that will be made new again? One founder has her money on ghee. Raquel Tavares Gunsagar launched her company, Fourth & Heart, two and a half years ago to sell her ancient butter alternative to contemporary consumers. For Tavares, timing proved critical. She introduced her product to the market just as America’s obsession with healthy fats, like avocado and coconut oil, was heating up.

After presenting at Expo West in 2015, she captured investor attention and secured a deal with leading organic and natural foods distributor UNFI. Just over a year out from launch and one rebrand later, Fourth & Heart closed a $1 million Series A on crowdfunding site CircleUp, lead by an anonymous private investor. The company, started with $80,000 of her personal savings, did $2.2 million in revenue in 2016, Tavares tells FORBES. “I had an idea and I didn’t know how fast it was going to take off,” says Tavares, who admits that she was surprised by how quickly her product was picked up by retailers. “We were in a small category and the idea was just starting to trend.” Since then, it’s become more mainstream.

Her ghee is now sold in 6,000 points of distribution including chains like Kroger, Whole Foods, Giant Eagle and Central Market. She’s hoping to launch in Target stores in 2017. “I see it picking up the most right now,” she says of the self-staple pantry item.

Why bring ghee back? Ghee, a type of clarified butter, dates back thousands of years to ancient India. It appears in the Indian holy text the Bhagavad Gita and was (and is) still used for religious rituals, as an alternative medicine, and, most commonly, as a staple item in diets and core to cooking many dishes.

Tavares became familiar with ghee at an early age because her mother worked as a registered dietitian and a practitioner of Ayurveda medicine, an ancient and holistic Indian healing system which uses ghee for treatments. When Tavares left her job in marketing, later teaming up with cofounder Lillian Wunsch, she considered what food item she could start a business around and put her unique stamp on. She looked at what had been done with yogurt and peanut butter, and after reflecting on her own experience, ghee became a natural fit. She launched using first her own savings and later a $135,000 friends and family round under the name Tava.

She knew her business was going after the formidable butter market, which produces over 100 million pounds of the spread each month, with big players like Land O’Lakes leading in market share. But, Ghee falls in a category just outside of it, as a butter replacement, like coconut oil. Nevertheless, the subcategory is expanding. According to industry experts, Ghee is the fastest growing category in the nearly $10 billion butter and butter replacement industry.

Why choose ghee over butter? Ghee differs from regular butter in a few key ways. It has a high smoke point, meaning unlike butter or coconut oil, it doesn’t easily burn when heated. It’s naturally spreadable, so it doesn’t need to be softened first and it also doesn’t need to be refrigerated. Ghee is lactose-free because it doesn’t contain any milk solids, which are filtered out during the cooking process. While it doesn’t lower cholesterol, it doesn’t add to it, and is high in fat soluble vitamins A, D and E.

While other, larger, companies like Organic Valley sell ghee, Tavares says no one else offers flavored options. Her variations on the original include Himalayan Pink Salt and White Truffle Salt, among others. Tavares says her product has been showcased by companies, like Whole Foods, that note ghee as a growing trend. This good press has been critical in reaching millennials, and, she says, has helped her take “about 11-14% of existing competition” in the category.

Fourth & Heart ghee is currently sold in glass jars, but, in March, Tavares will unveil a new line of sprays, pourable ghee and single-serving portions.

Looking ahead Although, generally speaking, food trends are fickle at best, Tavares has high hopes for her brand in 2017. “This year is exciting because it’s the year our brand will become a household name,” she says. She’s intent on educating consumers about the many virtues of ghee by going into grocery stores and conveying the brand message and story directly to buyers. In terms of financials for 2017, she looking to raise more money and, “in a perfect world, we’d double our revenue.” Natalie Sportelli , FORBES STAFF

Ghee! Why Clarified Butter Is Good for You

Ghee! Why Clarified Butter Is Good for You

Why Clarified Butter Is Good for You ?

Could butter—that icon of dietary naughtiness—actually be good for you? As it turns out, yes. One type in particular boasts a slew of surprise benefits: ghee, the clarified, concentrated form of the ingredient—an ancient staple of Indian cooking in which water and milk proteins are removed from cow’s milk butter through boiling, skimming, and straining. Hot on the heels of bone broth, ghee has been turning up with increasing frequency at the sort of hip, health-conscious establishments where the unabashed use of animal products might be least expected. “This may sound shocking coming from someone who’s known for guzzling organic green juice, but my diet is 40 to 60 percent fat,” says Moon Juice founder Amanda Chantal Bacon, who, though she mostly avoids animal foods, consumes ghee regularly and sells it at her stores. “I like to think of ghee as spiritual butter; when made with Vedic integrity”—that is, according to the instructions of traditional Hindu scripture—“it feeds our life force, calms the mind and nerves, and promotes the spiritual or psychic heat that is created through yoga. Getting enough good fat has radically enhanced my energy.” Ghee’s fat is “good” because it’s rich in medium chain triglycerides, or MCT, the same type found in health-nut-flavored coconut oil. These fatty acids are absorbed quickly by the body, making them a good source of energy, and have been linked to decreased hunger, increased metabolism, and weight loss. It’s also rich in butyric acid, a short-chain fatty acid which is anti-inflammatory and an essential component of strong immune and digestive systems; the anti-cancer and pro-weight-loss fatty acid conjugated linoleic acid (CLA); and vitamins A, D, and E, and K. Ghee is also a healthy choice as a cooking oil due to its unusually high smoke point of 450–485 degrees Fahrenheit (as compared with, say, extra-virgin olive oil’s 325–375 degrees)—the temperature at which oils begin to burn and release toxic, health-harming compounds. And, it “especially sings in vegetable dishes, because it adds a flavor and richness that cannot be achieved with basic butter or oil,” says Christina Lecki, a chef, ghee aficionado, and protégé of April Bloomfield’s who until recently ran the kitchen at New York’s The Breslin.

What’s more: Because the milk proteins have been completely removed from ghee, it is pure oil—stripped of its “dairy” components—and can even be eaten by the lactose intolerant; this quality also allows it to last several months unrefrigerated.

But it’s Ayurveda—the 5000-year-old wellness tradition in which ghee plays a prominent role—that makes the strongest case for the substance. According to the Charaka Samhita, one of the field’s classical writings, ghee can be used to improve vision, promote longevity, and enhance strength; and improves complexions, memory, and intelligence, to name just a few benefits. Indian teachings also credit ghee with emotional and spiritual healing properties, such as calming the nerves and developing intuition. And who, these days, couldn’t use a spoonful of that? Source : Vogue