ghee for provision throughout the country though it has been started from Punjab

ghee for provision throughout the country though it has been started from Punjab

It is a bitter fact that large number of people are not getting enough food, thus suffering from malnutrition. It is estimated, over 37 million Pakistanis are not getting enough food which is essential for their healthy life. The Department of International Development (DFID) of UK has laudably launched Food Fortification Programme as per its commitment to working with Pakistan to adequately tackle the nutrition emergency in the country.

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According to media reports, DIFD-Pakistan head Joanna Reid was joined at the launching ceremony in Lahore the other day by a delegation of Punjab government, British High Commission and the Food Fortification Programme officials.

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Food Fortification Programme as the very name indicates is aimed at improving nutrition situation; it includes the fortification of wheat flour, edible oil and ghee for provision throughout the country though it has been started from Punjab. The programme intends to improve the production, access and consumption of wheat flour fortified with iron, folic acid, vitamin B12 and zinc, edible oil and ghee also fortified with vitamins A and D.

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Provincial Food Minister Bilal Yasin has quite rightly remarked that the food fortification programme is an excellent initiative for the people of the province, pledged full support of the provincial government and the Punjab Food Authority for its successful implementation adding that the government working on the roadmap to effectively reduce incidence of malnutrition in the country in partnership with DFID.

It is a positive contribution to the UK appreciable aim of improving access and consumption of sufficient, nutritious and safe food particularly for women of childbearing age and children in order to considerably improve nutrition status in the country. The government has already pledged in Vision 2025 to make nutrition a priority and this surely matters a great deal for the health of the nation and for Pakistan’s prosperity.

Source : pakobserver

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Cholesterol matters, but oxidized levels of linoleic acid may matter more

Cholesterol matters, but oxidized levels of linoleic acid may matter more

 

Not all “good” fats are created equal BY Diane Nelson

There are good and bad fats, nutritionists say. But not all polyunsaturated fats, the so-called good fats, are created equal. A food chemist at UC Davis is exploring whether eating too much linoleic acid—a type of polyunsaturated fat found mainly in vegetable oils—can cause chronic inflammation, headaches, and other health problems.

“Others have shown that too much linoleic acid could be bad for the heart,” said Ameer Taha, an assistant professor with the Department of Food Science. “My research shows that it might also be bad for the brain.”

In collaboration with colleagues at the National Institutes of Health (NIH,) Taha conducted dietary tests with people who suffer drug-resistant, chronic migraine headaches. When migraine sufferers reduced linoleic acid and increased consumption of omega 3 fatty acids— polyunsaturated fats found in foods like fish and walnuts—their migraines decreased 40 percent. Taha has also shown that in rats, too much dietary linoleic acid reduces the brain’s capacity to cope with inflammation, which can cause migraines.

“Omega 3 fatty acids are relatively more healthy than linoleic acid and other Omega 6 fatty acids,” Taha said.

Translation: Fatty fish is more nutritious than French fries.

Good fat/bad fat

The dietary fat debate goes something like this: If we replace the saturated fats found in foods like beef and cheese with polyunsaturated fats—like those in vegetable oil—we will reduce our total cholesterol and improve our health.

Reducing cholesterol is good, Taha says, but there is more to it than many doctors and patients realize.

“Cholesterol matters, but oxidized levels of linoleic acid may matter more,” Taha said. “Replacing saturated fats with vegetable oils such as soybean and corn oil may not be the best strategy.”

Christopher Ramsden, a clinical investigator at NIH recently showed that diets replacing saturated fat with linoleic acid did not decrease the risk of heart attacks or death, despite lowering blood cholesterol. Taha was a postdoctoral fellow at NIH before joining the UC Davis faculty in 2014 and researched linoleic acid alongside Ramsden.

“Chris and his colleagues went back through data from the 1960s and found that study participants who ate a diet low in saturated fat and enriched with corn oil reduced their cholesterol by an average of 14 percent, but the low-saturated fat diet did not reduce mortality,” Taha said. “In fact, they found that the greater the drop in cholesterol, the higher the risk of death during the trial.”

How much is too much?

Our bodies need linoleic acid for basic functions like blood clotting and muscle movement, and we cannot synthesize it on our own. So, we have to consume some linoleic acid to stay healthy. The question is, what is the right amount?

Taha is currently developing methods to measure human requirements for linoleic acid, something that has never been fully understood. He and his team are looking at how much linoleic acid is secreted by the liver, for example, and how much linoleic acid the heart and brain consume.

“When we can measure how much the liver puts into the blood in relation to how much is consumed by organs, we can start to understand how much linoleic acid we should consume when we’re 2 and 20 and 70,” Taha said. “Requirements change with age, disease and genes. Knowing how much our body needs will allow us to better regulate our consumption of linoleic acid, so we will be healthier as a population, overall.”

Pass the butter

In the meantime, Taha says he sticks with fats that are relatively low in linoleic acid, like butter, ghee,olive oil, coconut oil, and canola oil. Processed foods are often high in linoleic acid because they are usually processed or fried in vegetable oils like corn and soybean oil.“You can trace the rise in linoleic consumption in North America to the rise in use of soybean and other vegetable oils in processed food,” Taha said. 

So, when it comes to “good” fats, foods high in omega 3 fatty acids (like grass-fed beef, salmon and walnuts) and low in omega-6 fatty acids, like extra-virgin olive oil, might be best of all.  

Media contact(s)

Diane Nelson, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Dean’s Office, 530-752-1969, denelson@ucdavis.edu

Ameer Taha, Department of Food Science, 530-752-7096, ataha@ucdavis.edu 

 

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Minto-based farm to receive $10,000 from Greenbelt Fund

Minto-based farm to receive $10,000 from Greenbelt Fund

PETERBOROUGH — A Minto-based farm is one of 19 local food projects in Ontario named as a recipient of funding from the province’s Greenbelt Fund.

It was announced on Sept. 29 that Bell’s Edge Farm, who produce specialty butter and ghee, will receive $10,000 from the fund to help grow their business.

A spoon of ghee full of health

According to a release from the Greenbelt Fund, Bell’s Edge Farm will purchase packaging equipment to optimize the production of local flavoured butter and ghee, while developing new products under their flavoured butter line.

“Through the Local Food Investment Fund, our government is supporting Ontario’s booming agri-food sector, to make it even easier for Ontarians to enjoy the good things grown, harvested and made in Ontario,” said Jeff Leal, Minister of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs.

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Bell’s Edge Farm is currently the only purveyor of ghee and flavoured butter sourced from Canadian ingredients. Bell’s Edge Farm forecasts an increase of $152,625 in local food sales during the project’s duration, and will create two full-time and three part-time job.

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Food fortification programme launched in punjab

Food fortification programme launched in punjab

 

Pakistan’s Food Fortification Programme (FFP) was launched in Punjab by the Head of the UK’s Department of International Development (DFID) today. The launch ceremony was held in Lahore to celebrate the start of edible oil and ghee and wheat flour food fortification in Punjab.

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Joanna Reid, Head of DFID Pakistan, visited the Data Flour Mill to inaugurate the equipment. A delegation of Punjab government, British High Commission and Food Fortification Programme officials also attended the ribbon-cutting ceremony.
Speaking at the event, DFID head Joanna Reid said, “The UK is committed to working with Pakistan to tackle the nutrition emergency. Over 37 million Pakistanis are not getting enough food and this hits women and girls hardest.

Vision 2025 is the Government’s pledge to make nutrition a priority – it matters for the health of the nation and for Pakistan’s future prosperity.

The UK has started a Food Fortification Programme to improve nutrition in Pakistan. This includes the fortification of wheat flour and edible oil and ghee across Pakistan starting in Punjab.

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The Food Fortification Programme aims to improve the production, access and consumption of wheat flour fortified with iron, folic acid, vitamin B12 and zinc, and edible oil and ghee fortified with vitamins A and D. Addressing the ceremony, Food Minister Bilal Yaseen said, “I can assure you that food fortification programme is an excellent initiative for our province and we pledge complete support of the Punjab government and the Punjab Food Authority for the programme. We are on the roadmap to effectively reduce malnutrition in Pakistan in partnership with DFID.”

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The programme is being implemented by Mott MacDonald and Nutrition International in collaboration with key government departments at national and provincial level and with industry associations including the Pakistan Flour Mills Association (PFMA) and Pakistan Vanaspati Manufacturers Association (PVMA).

A spoon of ghee full of health
The Food Fortification Programme is contributing to the UK’s aim of improving access and consumption of sufficient, nutritious and safe food for women of childbearing age and children to improve nutritional status in Pakistan.—PR

Source : pakobserver

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