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Grass-fed Ghee in your daily morning routine

Grass-fed Ghee in your daily morning routine

In simple terms, ghee is essentially the pure fat obtained from butter – clarified butter fat.

Everyone knows that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, and depending on what you eat for breakfast can determine how much energy you will have to start your day.

Incorporating ghee into your mornings can be a great way to kick-start your day with a nutritious fat.

Ghee has been around for centuries, but has recently been making a comeback to our modern kitchens as a staple super food. Good quality grass-fed ghee can be used as an alternative fat source to oils and butter and is very versatile and easily adaptable to many dishes.

The reason why it has gained an enormous amount of popularity recently is due to the world recognising its many health benefits such as including essential butyrate’s, CLAs, MCTs and vitamins. Using natural grass-fed ghee ensures you are feeding your body with the best quality fat and no nasty unneeded chemicals.

Grass-fed Ghee is already an essential part of many people’s morning routines around the world, here’s how:

Morning coffee:

Although putting grass-fed ghee in a hot drink sounds unusual, this has been incredibly popular amongst the Keto community.

The reasons behind this are that grass-fed ghee on an empty stomach provides a great energy booster to kick-start your day. If you are on a Keto diet, it is essential to minimise your carbohydrate intake, so starting your day off after an overnight fast with fats is perfect for your body to continue in ketosis (the aim of the Keto diet).

This way your body is burning fats and ultimately helping you lose weight overtime. The saturated fats in your ghee coffee or hot beverage allow the caffeine to be absorbed over an extended period of time, to give you energy for longer.

When mixed into a hot beverage, ghee can add a creamy nutty flavour to make your drink taste delicious.

Ghee Porridge:

Porridge has been a breakfast staple since forever, and there is no doubt that there is nothing a warm bowl of porridge during a winter morning can’t fix. Oats are an incredibly healthy option that keeps you full for hours.

Typically served with brown sugar, maple syrup, fresh fruits or nuts, porridge can never get boring as there are so many varieties of toppings to add. There is now an even more exciting addition to your porridge that will make you kick-start your morning filled with energy and nutrition- ghee oats.

Whether you like to make your oats in a rush from an instant sachet in the microwave or traditionally on a stove top, ghee porridge is just as simple to make as any other porridge you would. All you have to do is add a teaspoon of grass-fed ghee to your warm bowl of porridge after cooking and mix in the melted buttery goodness.

Not only will the ghee make your porridge smell and taste amazing, it also packs many nutrients into your most vital meal of the day.

Eggs

Eggs can be an essential part of a high protein diet. One egg contains around 6 grams of protein, and if you are consuming 2 eggs for breakfast, that is already over 20% of your daily protein intake. Eggs can be served boiled, scrambled, fried or poached. Ghee can be easily added to your morning eggs.

If you prefer to have your eggs fried or scrambled, just add a tablespoon of grass-fed ghee to a hot frying pan and fry your eggs as you would normally. Alternatively, if you prefer boiled eggs or poached, you can drizzle a teaspoon of ghee over them after they are cooked.

Ghee eggs can give you a great protein and fat hit in the morning to provide you with long lasting energy throughout the day.

Pancakes or waffles

Starting your Sunday morning with pancakes or waffles are the perfect weekend treat. Incorporating ghee into your pancakes is simple, just add a couple of teaspoons of grass-fed ghee to a hot frying pan before pouring in the batter and witness the aromatic flavours given off.

When serving the pancakes, you can drizzle a teaspoon of grass-fed ghee on top as well.

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Why Ghee Is The Better Butter??

Why Ghee Is The Better Butter??

Ghee Is The Better Butter: Why You Should Swap Butter out for Ghee

Ghee is the better butter. The world is going crazy over ghee and it isn’t for no reason. Two notably large dieting communities that are enjoying ghee and its many benefits are the Keto and Paleo dieters. Ghee is perfect for these diets due to its high fat content, absence of milk proteins and many great health benefits.

Good quality New Zealand grass-fed ghee offers high amounts of good fats, vitamins, butyrates and CLAs.

Ghee and butter both contain saturated fats, and although this term often comes with negative connotations, saturated fats are indeed needed to be consumed in moderation to support vital bodily functions such as building our cell membranes.

Fats from grass-fed ghee are essential in absorbing fat-soluble vitamins such as A, D, E & K, providing organ insulation, aiding cell structure and providing energy for growth.

  1. It is suitable for dairy intolerant consumers

During the ghee making process, milk proteins such as casein, whey and lactose are filtered out, leaving just pure butter fat. This makes ghee suitable for those that are dairy intolerant.

Although ghee is not considered vegan as it uses milk from dairy cows, it is much more diet friendly to those that are not suited to consume dairy. It is said that upto almost 65% of the world’s population has a reduced ability to digest dairy effectively, and can experience gut pains or problems if doing so.

Ghee has all the problematic milk sugars and solids removed, making it a much more gut friendly alternative to traditional butter.

So this leaves you with still being able to enjoy the rich buttery flavours of butter than many people love, but without the undesired dairy intolerance affects.

Tiny amounts of lactose or casein may still remain, so it is advised that severely intolerant consumers consult their physician before trying ghee for the first time.

  1. It contains more nutrients

If you are wanting to consume the right kinds of fats and provide yourself with lots of energy, cow ghee is a better choice than butter. Ghee contains Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCTs) and this is excellent in providing high energy levels and helping with cognitive functioning. Ghee also contains vitamins A, E, K and butyrates and CLAs.

  1. Better storage life

Ghee does not contain any milk solids or proteins, and due to this, has a longer shelf life. grass-fed ghee is pure butter fat, so it can be stored at room temperature for 1 year, and can last much longer in the fridge.

  1. It is more flavoursome

Grass-fed ghee contains the same buttery flavours that many people around the world love, but on top of this ghee has many unique flavours. Customers that love ghee say that it is nutty, and has a decadent caramelised flavour. It is also said to be more aromatic when cooking with.

  1. Ok for Paleo dieters

The classic Paleo diet does not include dairy, as dairy was not consumed in the Paleolithic Era which was around from 2.6 million years ago to about 12,000 years ago. But ghee, due to not containing dairy proteins, can be included in the Paleo diet if one wanted.

  1. Higher smoke point

Grass-fed ghee has a higher smoke point when compared to butter, so it doesn’t burn as quickly. This allows ghee to be used in a greater variety of cooking and cuisines than butter than. Butter can smoke and burn at 350°F (177°C), but ghee can withstand heat up to 485°F (252°C).

This makes ghee perfect for stirfrying, baking, roasting and barbequing. A higher smoke point ensures that there will not be toxic substances being introduced into your foods during the burning. It is simple to replace ghee in place of butter in your cooking, just replace it 1:1.

Grass-fed ghee is also safer for cooking with than butter and other oils as it produces less acrylamide which is a toxin. Acrylamide is a potential carcinogen and can be released when starch containing foods are cooked at high temperatures.

  1. Better for your skin

Many have claimed that dairy can have adverse affects on your skin. This can lead to acne and unwanted blemishes.

Grass-fed Ghee is a better alternative if dairy is something you wish to cut out of your diet but still wish to have the buttery flavours in your foods.

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Cholesterol matters, but oxidized levels of linoleic acid may matter more

Cholesterol matters, but oxidized levels of linoleic acid may matter more

 

Not all “good” fats are created equal BY Diane Nelson

There are good and bad fats, nutritionists say. But not all polyunsaturated fats, the so-called good fats, are created equal. A food chemist at UC Davis is exploring whether eating too much linoleic acid—a type of polyunsaturated fat found mainly in vegetable oils—can cause chronic inflammation, headaches, and other health problems.

“Others have shown that too much linoleic acid could be bad for the heart,” said Ameer Taha, an assistant professor with the Department of Food Science. “My research shows that it might also be bad for the brain.”

In collaboration with colleagues at the National Institutes of Health (NIH,) Taha conducted dietary tests with people who suffer drug-resistant, chronic migraine headaches. When migraine sufferers reduced linoleic acid and increased consumption of omega 3 fatty acids— polyunsaturated fats found in foods like fish and walnuts—their migraines decreased 40 percent. Taha has also shown that in rats, too much dietary linoleic acid reduces the brain’s capacity to cope with inflammation, which can cause migraines.

“Omega 3 fatty acids are relatively more healthy than linoleic acid and other Omega 6 fatty acids,” Taha said.

Translation: Fatty fish is more nutritious than French fries.

Good fat/bad fat

The dietary fat debate goes something like this: If we replace the saturated fats found in foods like beef and cheese with polyunsaturated fats—like those in vegetable oil—we will reduce our total cholesterol and improve our health.

Reducing cholesterol is good, Taha says, but there is more to it than many doctors and patients realize.

“Cholesterol matters, but oxidized levels of linoleic acid may matter more,” Taha said. “Replacing saturated fats with vegetable oils such as soybean and corn oil may not be the best strategy.”

Christopher Ramsden, a clinical investigator at NIH recently showed that diets replacing saturated fat with linoleic acid did not decrease the risk of heart attacks or death, despite lowering blood cholesterol. Taha was a postdoctoral fellow at NIH before joining the UC Davis faculty in 2014 and researched linoleic acid alongside Ramsden.

“Chris and his colleagues went back through data from the 1960s and found that study participants who ate a diet low in saturated fat and enriched with corn oil reduced their cholesterol by an average of 14 percent, but the low-saturated fat diet did not reduce mortality,” Taha said. “In fact, they found that the greater the drop in cholesterol, the higher the risk of death during the trial.”

How much is too much?

Our bodies need linoleic acid for basic functions like blood clotting and muscle movement, and we cannot synthesize it on our own. So, we have to consume some linoleic acid to stay healthy. The question is, what is the right amount?

Taha is currently developing methods to measure human requirements for linoleic acid, something that has never been fully understood. He and his team are looking at how much linoleic acid is secreted by the liver, for example, and how much linoleic acid the heart and brain consume.

“When we can measure how much the liver puts into the blood in relation to how much is consumed by organs, we can start to understand how much linoleic acid we should consume when we’re 2 and 20 and 70,” Taha said. “Requirements change with age, disease and genes. Knowing how much our body needs will allow us to better regulate our consumption of linoleic acid, so we will be healthier as a population, overall.”

Pass the butter

In the meantime, Taha says he sticks with fats that are relatively low in linoleic acid, like butter, ghee,olive oil, coconut oil, and canola oil. Processed foods are often high in linoleic acid because they are usually processed or fried in vegetable oils like corn and soybean oil.“You can trace the rise in linoleic consumption in North America to the rise in use of soybean and other vegetable oils in processed food,” Taha said. 

So, when it comes to “good” fats, foods high in omega 3 fatty acids (like grass-fed beef, salmon and walnuts) and low in omega-6 fatty acids, like extra-virgin olive oil, might be best of all.  

Media contact(s)

Diane Nelson, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Dean’s Office, 530-752-1969, denelson@ucdavis.edu

Ameer Taha, Department of Food Science, 530-752-7096, ataha@ucdavis.edu 

 

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5 reasons you should definitely have ghee this winter

5 reasons you should definitely have ghee this winter

5 reasons you should definitely have ghee this winter

This Indian superfood has stood the test of time, and is actually quite healthy.

Sounds unbelievable, doesn’t it? Our mothers and grandmothers have been pushing us to have thoda ghee since we were kids. We didn’t, because we were told that all fats are high in cholesterol, and can lead to a bunch of health issues. But actually, ghee can do us bucket loads of good!

If you’ve come across conversations with Kareena Kapoor Khan, and her renowned nutritionist friend, Rujuta Diwekar, you’ll already know that it’s true–ghee is actually really good for us. When we first came across Diwekar’s arguments, we were as surprised as you are. Over the last decade or so, nutritionists and dieticians have been telling us to cut off the fat from our lives, whether it’s oil, ghee, or lard.

So how the hell can ghee actually be good for us?

Because granny said so

Ghee is one of the dairy products that have been made and consumed in India since time immemorial. Let’s just say that generations of people in this subcontinent have grown up on ghee. We have it raw, with rice, on our dal or rotis, and even in our curries–and we’ve been doing this for centuries. So our physique is used to and built with ghee, from birth to death. And if our systems are naturally used to ghee, how can it be bad for us? Simple logic dictates that daadi ke nuskhe rarely go wrong. So how can it be wrong where ghee is concerned?

Nectar of life

According to ayurveda, the panchamrit as or five nectars of life are honey, sugar, milk, yogurt, and (guess what?) ghee! These ingredients aren’t just used because they’re ritually associated with the divine or the sacred. They actually have individual connotations, according to their specific characteristics. Ghee, for example, represents knowledge and victory. It’s obvious then, isn’t it? Having ghee actually makes you smarter, because it almost works like a brain tonic!

The superfood that burns fat

Contrary to popular believe, ghee is not an ordinary fat. It’s actually a part of the small group of top-performing fats in the world, and has short chain fatty acids. As Rujuta Diwekar explains, these fats actually help break down body fat, and increase the count of healthy bacteria in the gut and stomach. So instead of making you obese, ghee actually helps shed fat and lose weight naturally! Don’t believe us? Just check out this Instagram post by actress Huma Qureshi:

Fight off diseases

If you’ve been wondering how to fight off diseases related to your blood sugar levels, like diabetes, PCOD and obesity, here’s how. You need to have food with low glycemic index, and the best way to do that is to add ghee. Adding ghee to food reduces its glycemic index, which in turn helps regulate your blood sugar levels. So instead of leading to these diseases, ghee is a fat that helps our bodies build up the immunity to fight it.

It’s simply yummy

Finally, let’s just come down to the very basic reason to have ghee–it’s superbly delicious. Adding ghee to your food enhances its flavour like nothing else can. And it doesn’t even matter if the thing you’re cooking up is sweet, savoury or spicy. Ghee goes with everything. The heat generated from having food with ghee on top, in it, or even fried in it, will help you stay warm this winter, and every winter to come.

So let go of the guilt associated with ghee. It’s not a villain you need to avoid, but actually a blessing you must include in your daily life. Trust us, your body and palate will both thank you for having a little bit of ghee.

Source : India Today

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