Planning to ditch Ghee for weight lose?

Planning to ditch Ghee for weight lose?

Planning to ditch Ghee for weight lose? Read here!

Talk to a fitness freak and he’ll run miles away from a spoon full of ghee. But did you know that ghee has a lot of health benefits that is good for your mind and soul.

Ghee doesn’t add to your fats, instead make your body fit and fine. It’s more of a power-food. There’s a reason why your mother and grandmother still ask you to have ghee in your food everyday.

Here are 15 amazing benefits of ghee you did not know till now. And even if you knew, it’s just a gentle reminder to add it back to your diet.

Background.

1- You can cook and fry with ghee and it will not break down into free radicals like many other oils.

2- People who are lactose or casein intolerant face no issues with ghee. This is because, Ghee is made from butter but the milk solids and impurities get removed.

3- Ghee is rich in the oil soluble vitamins A and E.

4- It is also rich in K2 and CLA.

5- It is as rich as Coconut oil. It’s medium chain fatty acids are absorbed directly by the liver and burned as energy. Consumption of ghee is highly recommended for Athletes.

6- You have been living with wrong notion all these years. Ghee actually helps you in losing weight. The energy from these medium chain fatty acids can be used to burn other fats in the system and lose weight.

7- It strengthens your digestion and immune system.

8- It also has Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Cancer properties.

9- It kills the negative emotions in you, thus making you spirit healthy and positive.

10- According to Ayurveda, ghee is considered one of the most sattvic foods which promotes positivity, growth and expansion of consciousness.

11- Many of the medicinal properties of herbs and spices can be absorbed and transported to targeted areas of the body with the consumption of ghee.

12- It enhances and improves eye-sight.

13- Ghee is good for your skin too.

14- It aids your brain health.

15- And it removes all impurities from your body.

Source : laughingcolours

The Ketogenic Diet Versus Low Fat Diet Plans

The Ketogenic Diet Versus Low Fat Diet Plans

Much has been said over the years about the ketogenic diet and with celebrities like Megan Fox, Mick Jagger, and Adriana Lima being fond proponents of the diet, it remains very popular.

What is the real difference between a ketogenic diet and a low fat diet plan? While many may swear about reducing fat intake, studies show low carb plans are actually more effective for both weight loss and reducing high cholesterol.

Ketogenic Diet

There are several low carbohydrate diets, but the ketogenic diet generally limits your carb intake to 20 to 50 grams a day. The ketogenic diet requires you to enter the stage of ketosis, and that generally does not occur unless you are consuming about 20 grams of carbohydrates per day.

A sample menu plan when you’re on a ketogenic diet looks like this:

Breakfast: bacon or sausage, eggs, and coffee with cream and stevia

Snack: 1 ounce of cheese with cucumbers or celery

Lunch: Tuna salad or egg salad wrapped in lettuce or lettuce wrapped burger with ghee

Snack: ½ avocado or 10 olives or flaxseed crackers with salsa

Dinner: Cajun chicken with a side of vegetables cooked in ghee or steak with vegetables in ghee or salad with olive oil and vinegar or grilled salmon with a side of spiral cut zucchini pasta with sauce

Snacks between meals can also include string cheese, a cup of chicken broth, 6 almonds or peanuts, turkey lettuce wraps, hard-boiled eggs, smaller portions of leftover meals, 1 tablespoon of cream and much more.

See the Video For More information

Low Carb Diet for Nutritional Ketosis

Low Carb Diet for Nutritional Ketosis

How to Add More Fat to Your Low Carb Diet for Nutritional Ketosis

Lately the interwebs have been buzzing with Jimmy Moore’s summer 2012 weight loss success after tweaking his macronutrient ratios. I have been on the edge of my seat waiting to see how he did it. He is basing his new refined low carb diet on the advice from the great book The Art and Science of Low Carb Performance by Dr. Phinney and Dr. Volek.

Just like Jimmy, many long time low carbers and nutrition enthusiasts have tried various methods – thyroid/adrenal protocols, parasite cleanses, homeopathy, HCG diets, colonics/enema’s, Leptin resets, green juices, bone broth diets, probiotics, meditation, EFT, positive thinking, HITT training, Slow Burn, Crossfit – you name it. We can all relate to his struggle of “doing everything right” but not losing weight. Maybe Jimmy Moore, Dr. Phinney and Dr. Volek have found the missing link to the low carb weight loss puzzle: restricting protein? Jimmy’s success in losing weight has given us all hope that if he can do it, maybe we can also bust through our own personal plateaus.

Is monitoring protein and increasing fat the answer to low carb weight loss stalls? It is worth a shot and it can’t hurt to try, as long we make sure to eat the highest quality fats. Read my article about which fats are healthy to eat here: Which Fats Are Healthy at GrassFedGirl.com. Please make sure and eat the right fats or you will not succeed long term on a low carb diet.

Protein free for all:

I came into low carb and paleo in the summer of 2010, and have always eaten plenty of protein and fat without worrying about percentages. This lifestyle has kept my weight stable, tamed my autoimmune condition and helped me regulate my blood sugar but I would love to lose a few extra pounds (who wouldn’t?). I have seen Paleo and low carb work wonders in my clients as well, but some people need extra help to fine-tune their low carb results.

Keto-what?

In their book, Phinney and Volek instruct readers to restrict protein and carbs to lose weight and become keto-adapted. Keto adaptation is where the body burns fat instead of relying on glucose (carbs) for fuel. The authors think that if we eat too much protein it will also turn to sugar, preventing the body from becoming keto-adapted and burning its own fat as fuel.

What should my protein intake be?

What does limiting protein mean in practical terms and how much do we actually need daily to get into nutritional ketosis? This chart should from A New Atkins for a New You, should help:

Don’t forget to keep counting those carbs:

Another tip Dr. Volek and Dr. Phinney give readers in The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance is to keep carbs very low — 50 grams or less.

Getting into the optimal Ketone Zone:

It is my understanding that optimal levels for nutritional ketosis and fat burning are (1.5 – 3 mmol/L) mode. This can be measured with a blood ketone meter. It can take a week or so to get into this zone, so keep checking and don’t give up.

How to increase your fat:

If someone is limiting protein and carbs, they need to increase fat to be full after meals. Fat is very satiating. But who wants to eat plain butter? I wanted to give you some interesting ways to lower protein intake but still feel fulfilled without resorting to drinking olive oil.

Ghee: butter makes it better:

Add butter to each bite of meat. Dr. Volek and Phinney advise using Irish grass fed butter because it is more nutritious. I like to add a big bite of grass fed butter to each bite of meat to speed satiation. Don’t forget about ghee which is just butter with the casein removed. Ghee is extra delicious on top of steaks and soups. Some people who can’t tolerate butter can tolerate ghee.

Cheese please:

Add a variety of cheese if tolerated, but try to get organic and/or raw milk cheese whenever possible. Hormones and antibiotics that are given to animals are concentrated in milk products. Use caution on serving sizes; in his New Diet Revolution, Dr. Atkins advised a limit of 4 oz of cheese per day. If your weight loss stalls, removing dairy may help speed up results. It is a common food sensitivity, causing intestinal stress.

Cream of the crop:

Add cream if tolerated; again go for grass-fed and organic dairy to lower the chemical burden on the liver; this will improve fat burning. Also check for the thickener carrageenan, a carcinogen and gut irritant.

Veggies as Fat Vehicles:

Use low carb veggies like kale chips, spinach, celery, endive, romaine, etc, as a fat vehicles. See my last article on CarbSmart.com about adding crunch to your low carb diet.

Mucho (homemade) Mayo:

Try this easy recipe for macadamia nut oil mayo, it will add life to chicken or ham. Beware low quality fats like soybean and canola; Volek and Phinney find they can make low carbers feel unwell.

A closer look at the low-carb, high-fat ketogenic diet

A closer look at the low-carb, high-fat ketogenic diet

A closer look at the low-carb, high-fat ketogenic diet, including side effects and concerns

It has been called, among other names, the modified Paleo diet, Atkins and Primal diet, but for many people eager to slim down, the ketogenic diet has emerged as a favourite. But it does have its critics.

There’s been a lot of interest in the ketogenic diet over the past five years. Prominent celebrities have tried it, including basketball superstar LeBron James, who was on the diet for 67 days in 2014 and lost 9 kilograms, his 6-foot 7-inch frame emerging a whole lot leaner than it had been going in. Other stars include Matthew McConaughey, Adriana Lima, Gwyneth Paltrow, Megan Fox, Tim McGraw and Robin Wright. With well-known individuals such as these jumping on the ketogenic bandwagon, it’s no surprise the diet gained popularity.

The ketogenic diet involves eating primarily fats and proteins, while restricting carbohydrates. But, not all types of fat are on the menu. Preference is given to monounsaturated fats (such as avocado, macadamia nuts and olive oil) and polyunsaturated omega-3s that are found in animal sources such as fatty fish and seafood. Healthier types of saturated fats (such as ghee, butter and coconut oil) are also allowed, but not factory-farmed meat and fish, or trans-fats.

This is combined with a restriction of carbohydrates, including complex carbohydrates, such as wholegrains, and all kinds of sugar (simple carbohydrates), such as soft drinks and fruit.

Carbohydrates are replaced by extra protein in the form of meats, fish, cheese and tofu. Seeds, low-carb, high-fibre fruits such as raspberries, and high-fibre, low-starch vegetables such as spinach and broccoli help to add fibre to the diet.

Over the years, the ketogenic diet has been called many things: the modified Paleo diet, the Atkins diet, the LCHF (low-carb, high-fat) diet, and the Primal diet. At its core, however, the ketogenic diet simply uses a scientific principle called ketosis – a metabolic state in which the body uses fat instead of glycogen (the form in which carbohydrates are stored in the body) as the primary source of energy. This, in turn, creates weight loss.

Once the body’s glycogen supply dries up, it starts breaking down fat to produce ketones in the liver, which are then used as energy. Since insulin is produced to regulate the glucose levels in the blood, low-carb diets may improve the body’s insulin sensitivity and reduce insulin resistance, one of the major causes of diabetes.

Dubai-based entrepreneur, 25-year-old Safwan Sabqi, lost 11 kilograms in the first month of following a ketogenic diet. “I had a high body-fat percentage, and weight loss depends on metabolism which can vary and be restrictive, depending on one’s body. But I had never seen this kind of success with any other diet before,” Sabqi says.

In the next two months, Sabqi lost 13 more kilograms, bringing his total weight loss to 24kg in three months. “I did break the diet a few times by eating high-carb foods – they’re really tough to resist – but I also worked out diligently for 20 minutes a day,” he adds.

While Sabqi practised the diet unsupervised, relying entirely on information from the internet, experts warn against this. Professor Thomas N Seyfried from Boston College, who has extensively researched the diet, urges people to be cautious. “Ketogenic diets can be very unhealthy if consumed in excess amounts. Excess consumption causes dyslipidemia [an unhealthy alteration of blood lipid parameters] and insulin insensitivity,” says Seyfried. Without supervision, there is a very real danger of nutritional imbalance, which can lead to hair loss, fatigue and muscle wastage, he explains.

The causes of nutritional imbalances are varied – too much fat and too little protein, consumption of unhealthy fats, malnutrition, lack of calcium due to restricted dairy intake and not getting enough fibre, to name a few. Individual factors need to be considered too: serious exercisers and athletes need a certain amount of carbohydrates for good muscle health. Since vegetarians have few protein sources in the absence of legumes, this poses another challenge that requires careful monitoring.

As is the case with any diet that restricts certain food groups, there are experts who champion it and others who are sceptical about its practicality and potential long-term consequences. Clinical dietitian, Mitun De Sarkar, managing director of Simply Healthy Foods in Dubai, does not subscribe to the ketogenic diet philosophy. “In my 15 years of experience, I have learnt that all forms of restrictive diets only result in a short-term weight loss,” she says. “The body expels water to adjust to the ‘shock’ to the system, but the results are temporary. The lost weight is usually regained – with interest – as soon as one goes off it, since the body tries to latch on to all the nutrients it was deprived of in the restrictive diets.”

Dr Graham Simpson, founder of the Dubai preventive medicine, healthcare company Intelligent Health, feels differently and says the diet is safe. “It can be done by most people – unless they suffer from renal failure – and is the single best way to lose weight,” he says.

Simpson dismisses concerns about the ketogenic diet being unhealthy and drastic. “There are many people who don’t know the difference between physiological ketosis – the healthy production of ketones due to dietary alterations – and pathological ketoacidosis, which is a metabolic derangement seen in type 1 diabetes and is very dangerous,” says Simpson. “Apart from weight loss, the diet can help with other health issues such as epilepsy, sleep disorders, diabetes, polycystic ovary syndrome, acne and many others,” he adds.

But there are side effects: bad breath, mood swings and the possibility of dehydration. The production of ketones results in terrible breath, and since the brain is designed to receive 90 per cent of its energy from carbs, its deprivation can cause mood swings, especially in the initial weeks while the body is adjusting. Additionally, a person on a low-carb diet needs to increase their water intake. Since each gram of glycogen is accompanied by a few grams of water, in the absence of glycogen, there is the risk of dehydration.

Though both Seyfried and Simpson declare the diet safe, it is advisable for certain individuals to refrain from it, including those with renal failure or pancreatic insufficiencies (since it makes digestion of fats more difficult), as well as people who have had bariatric surgery. Anyone considering a major dietary change should consult their doctor or a registered dietitian.

Source : thenational