Top butter alternatives for a healthier lifestyle

Top butter alternatives for a healthier lifestyle

If you’re going to say that you use butter a lot and that you love cooking with butter, no one will blame you as that’s how most people feel about it.

However, that doesn’t change the fact that it’s not quite the most healthy ingredient in our favorite meals.

There are many substitutes which can replace butter, if one would wish for a healthier path. If you’re interested in what other healthier ingredients can be used to replace butter, read on as we explore the cooking variety of butter alternatives.


If you haven’t heard of ghee before, it’s alright. Now you get the chance to learn more about this great butter alternative. Actually, ghee itself is a form of clarified butter. It has a lot of qualities which positively differentiate it from butter however, such as its distinct aroma and nut –heavy nature.

It’s a very good replacement for butter and can be used anytime you wish to bake something. It withstands high temperatures and it’s great for cooking all kinds of products.

Coconut oil

Coconut oil is great for cooking, and it can replace butter with no problem. Coconut oil is known for having a ton of different functions in the kitchen and outside it. In fact there are more than coconut oil benefits which you can learn about.

Specifically in the kitchen you can use coconut oil not just for the mix but also for your pans and pots instead of using another type of oil or butter. It’s definitely a healthier approach than just dropping a block of butter in the pan. On another note, pure black seed oil can help with Fungal Infections and various health issues.


This is something that you probably didn’t expect, but if you don’t have any butter at hand you can even use bananas for your dish. In their regular form they don’t look much like a butter replacement. But if you mash them up, they become a pasty substance which is optimal and well functioning for the duties butter would play in your recipe. It makes a healthy butter substitute for toast.

It’s easy to use and it brings a lot of nutrients to the table, making whatever you are cooking that much healthier, not to mention tastier. Let’s not forget that bananas will also give your dish a rich aroma.


This is yet another odd but very effective replacement for butter. You can use pumpkin similarly to how you would use bananas. You mash it up gently until you obtain the paste like substance you desire, then use it accordingly as a butter substitute oil in your recipe.

These are some very effective ways to stay healthy and remove a health detriment from your diet. Depending on what you are cooking and where you need butter in the mix, you can substitute it with one of these options, which you can interchange as it pleases you. The result will be a healthier meal that you can enjoy.

Top butter alternatives for a healthier lifestyle – Alice Wallace

The goodness of Ghee from Rujuta’s gyan

The goodness of Ghee from Rujuta’s gyan

The goodness of Ghee

After rice, I feel Ghee occupies the unenviable position as one of the most misunderstood foods in India today. At one time considered the food of Gods, its now a “fattening” ingredient and somehow responsible for the lifestyle diseases of this generation. But is that the truth? Since the 70s and 80s when inspired by the marketing and propaganda of “heart healthy” vegetable oils, an entire country let go off its 5000-year old food wisdom to eat Ghee, has our heart health really improved? Are there fewer cases now of diabetes, high cholesterol, etc? Or did we make a blunder when Ghee was labeled “saturated fat” and pushed in the same category as trans-fats and hydrogenated fats?

Things we don’t know or don’t bother to know about Ghee Most common myths about Ghee and where you should banish them
Ghee has antibacterial and antiviral properties. Other than helping you recover from sickness, it ensures that you don’t fall sick. Ghee is fattening – Ghee by nature is lipolytic, that which breaks down fat. And this is due to its unique short chain fatty acid structure.
The anti-oxidants in Ghee make it the miraculous anti-wrinkling and anti-ageing therapy you were searching for. Ghee is a saturated fat – It’s a saturated fat, yes, but with such a unique structure that it actually helps mobilize fats from stubborn fat areas of the body. Not a saturated fat like trans-fats in your biscuits, cakes, pizza, etc.
Ghee is excellent for joint health as it lubricates and oxygenates them. Ghee will increase cholesterol – Ghee reduces cholesterol by increasing contribution of lipids towards metabolism. Liver produces excess cholesterol under stress. Ghee helps you de-stress, sleep better and wake up fresher.
Ghee takes nutrients from your food and deliver them through fat permeable membranes like in the brain. Ghee is harmful for heart – Rich in antioxidants, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and fat soluble vitamins like A, E, D, Ghee has just what you need for a healthy heart.
Ghee improves your satiety signal and ensures you eat the right amount of food. Ok, ok fine, Ghee is good, but must not eat it too much – Traditionally we add Ghee in each meal. The quantity at which the taste of food is best is the right quantity. Only your tongue and stomach can tell you that.

What does our ancient food wisdom tells us: Runam krutva, ghrutam pibet – take a loan, but drink ghee. Cook in it or add on top of cooked food, it will continue to bless you.

P.S: And yes, the best Ghee is the one made at home from an Indian cow’s milk. The next decent option is Ghee from buffalo milk. The jersey cow milk and Ghee has no benefits that you seek. So that rules out the tetra packed milk unfortunately. What you can do is – support a goshala and help preserve the Indian cow.
For people outside India – Use the best possible option but start making a demand for Indian cow milk/ butter. Especially if you are in a country where “customer is the king”.



Source :

Does Ghee Contain Oxidized Cholesterol?

Does Ghee Contain Oxidized Cholesterol?

Does Ghee Contain Oxidized Cholesterol?

Posted on August 22nd, 2006 by Dave

However, several western doctors or scientists make the opposite claim. Who is right?

I’m having trouble finding good quality research papers that provide a definitive answer. If anyone has some good references, please let me know.

I do know of one report by Marc S. Jacobsen in the September 19, 1987 issue of the Lancet on pages 656-658. Ghee was found to contain about 12.3% of all sterols in the form of cholesterol oxides. That’s bad news. [Update: it is also not true.] Jacobsen attributed the high morbidity and mortality from coronary heart disease of Asian Indians living in the London area to consumption of ghee containing these angiotoxic oxidized sterols.

However, that conclusion does not make sense because CHD was relatively unknown in India until around 50-60 years ago in spite of high consumption of ghee. Furthermore, ghee is revered in ayurveda, and there is a very strong trend where modern science confirms the ayurvedic practices it investigates. (This is similar to what happens when it investigates oriential medicine practices such as acupuncture.) I suspect that further research would lend further support for the ayurvedic view on ghee. However, in the mean time, I really want a definitive answer on the oxidized cholesterol question and Jacobsen’s old report in the Lancet doesn’t satisfy me.

I also want to point out that not all ghee is created equal. Some resembles butter in that it is semi solid at room temperature. Other ghee is a golden liquid at room temperature like a vegetable oil.

UPDATE : I’ll add a personal note. I did an experiment of sorts. Soon after my physician performed my annual physical exam, complete with blood work, I added ghee to my diet. I typically ate 2 tbsp of ghee per day for a year. After a year of doing this, all measures of my cardiac health improved. My total and LDL cholesterol both went down. In the physical at the end of that year, the cardiologist was so impressed he declared I would never have heart trouble. He indicated I was one of the most exceptionally healthy patients he had seen.

Of course, this does not represent a rigorous scientific experiment. But it does indicate that eating ghee every day has been good for my heart. My pre-ghee diet was very healthy by almost any standards. Most people (but not me) would consider my diet with ghee to be slightly less healthy — although it is still very healthy. For example, I eat organic fruits and veggies, no processed foods, I rarely eat at restaurants, etc. On the pre-ghee diet, I occasionally ate organic eggs, but on the ghee-included diet I replaced the eggs with whole milk almost every day. By the way, I lost a little weight on the ghee plus whole milk diet, even though my fat intake went up and my exercise stayed the same. As you can see, several variables changed, so I can’t make any concrete claims — except that all measurements of my heart health (including two EKG’s, an exercise stress test, blood work and full cardiologist exam) pronounced my heart in tip top shape after the year of eating ghee almost every day.

Source : Free Radical

Fair price shops to provide Rs 10 discounts on ghee and paneer

Fair price shops to provide Rs 10 discounts on ghee and paneer

Fair price shops to provide Rs 10 discounts on ghee and paneer

KATHMANDU, August 28: Government-operated fair price market has decided to provide discount of Rs 10 on a kilogram of ghee or paneer produced by Dairy Development Corporation (DDC).

The market targeted to fulfill the demand of consumers in upcoming festivals of Dashain, Tihar and Chhath will also provide discounts on vegetables like onion and potato. The decision was made at a meeting attended by Supplies minister Shiva Kumar Mandal in Kathmandu.

According to a statement issued on Sunday, the market operated by Nepal Food Corporation and Salt Trading Corporation will provide discounts on onion and potato.

President of Federation of Fruits and Vegetable Entrepreneurs in Nepal, Khom Prasad Ghimire, said that the market will make vegetables available at rates cheaper than those of other retailers.

“Only the transportation cost will be added on the wholesale price of the vegetables that are put on sale.” He said, adding that they will try to put garlic, ginger and chilly in the market as well.

The minister of supplies has directed concerned bodies such as the Department of Agriculture and Livestock Development, consumer right activists, and traders to maintain the standard of consumer goods.

“Consumers are suffering because of the huge margin that traders put on the goods while selling,” Mandal said: “Consumers will benefit if the wholesaler puts only 7 to 10 percent and the retailers put 20 percent of profit margin in the goods.”

Source : myrepublica